Author: practis

Back to School Sleep Tips

Summertime can take a toll on a child’s sleep routine. Sleepovers, vacations and fewer responsibilities make it easy for children to get out of a consistent sleep schedule, making the back to school transition that much more difficult.

We sat down with Attending Neurologist and Director of the DENT Sleep Center, Dr. Marc Frost, who explained how to ease your children back into a sleep routine, and why instilling healthy sleep habits in your children now will not only help them this school year, but can benefit them the rest of their lives. 

1.  What is the recommended amount of sleep for children and young adolescents?

“Depending on age, it could be as much as 8-9 or even 10 hours,” said Dr. Frost. “The best way to know that a child isn’t getting enough sleep is to note signs of tiredness throughout the day.”

Dr. Frost stated that signs of tiredness in children can manifest differently than in adults who will just feel tired and sleep.

“Children may sleep and nap, but may also just be inattentive. Children may even appear to be daydreaming, or show the opposite of what you might expect and be somewhat hyperactive.”

Dr. Frost added that mood and personality changes may also be observed.

2. What are some steps parents can take to get their children back on a regular sleep schedule?

“Taking steps to create a consistent routine should start the week prior to school,” said Dr. Frost. This routine can be created by putting children to bed and waking them up at the time you would normally for school. This will help ease children back into the school sleep routine.

“And as always, no electronics in the bed or bedroom and no caffeine in the evening,” added Dr. Frost.

3. Why is a consistent sleep schedule so important? Is it especially important for school-age children?

“We tend to be creatures of habit, so a regular schedule will promote regular sleep.” said Dr. Frost. “Instilling these habits in your children now will promote lifelong healthy sleep habits that will prevent sleep problems later in life.”

4. Is there evidence to suggest that children who have a consistent sleep schedule perform better in school?

“Tired children are inattentive and potentially hyperactive children,” said Dr. Frost. “This will clearly lead to poorer performance in school.”

Dr. Frost also added that poor sleep can lead to depression and anxiety, which will affect children both at school and at home. 

5. How can parents help their children practice healthy sleep habits?

Practicing the habits mentioned above can help children achieve a better quality of sleep, especially with school around the corner. 

“Parents also need to try and lead by example by maintaining good habits themselves,” said Dr. Frost. 

 

The content of this post is intended for general educational and informational purposes only; it does not constitute medical advice. Readers should always consult with a licensed healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment.

 

5 Tips for Brain Health

The brain is an incredible organ filled with 100 billion neurons that seamlessly communicate, allowing you to complete tasks from breathing to critical problem solving. Amazingly, it only takes the brain around 1/10,000th of a second to identify a need and respond with the appropriate action.

According to the National Institute on Aging, “Brain health refers to the ability to remember, learn, play, concentrate and maintain a clear, active mind. It is the ability to draw on the strengths of your brain—information management, logic, judgement, perspective and wisdom.”

Essentially, brain health refers to the idea that lifestyle factors play a large role in how well your brain functions. Practicing healthy habits gives the brain the tools necessary to function at its highest potential, and maintaining optimal brain health is an important part of reducing the risks aging poses to cognition. 

We sat down with Attending Neurologist and Director of the DENT Concussion Center, Dr. Jennifer McVige, who shared her tips for maintaining brain health.

1.Use it or Lose It

“Your brain, just like any other muscle needs to be exercised,” said Dr. McVige, “To keep your brain functioning at its highest potential, you must exercise your brain as you would exercise your body.”

You can keep the brain sharp by participating in activities that require mental stimulation.These activities could include reading, solving puzzles, even learning a foreign language. The best way to maintain cognitive health is to never stop learning new information.

“Staying cognitively fit will keep you more alert as you get older,” added Dr. McVige.

2. Maintain a Healthy Diet

A well-balanced diet, makes for a well-balanced brain.  A few common ‘brain foods,’ or foods that are scientifically proven to protect your brain, include; blueberries, wild salmon, dark leafy greens like kale and spinach, and dark chocolate.

“If you put junk food into your body your brain will not work as effectively. Stay away from high sugar, high fat processed foods and try to eat clean,” said Dr. McVige.

3.  Physical Exercise

What’s good for the body is good for the brain!

“Regular physical exercise helps your brain work better,” said McVige. “Exercise increases blood flow to the entire body, allowing us to process information better.”

4. Sleep

 Sleep is a vital part of staying mentally and physically healthy.

“A proper sleep regimen is important for adequate brain health. Sleep deprivation can cause difficulty with concentrating, create mood issues, and even cause headaches.”

5.  Be Conscious of Brain Injuries

“When in doubt sit out,” said Dr. McVige. “Your brain is a beautiful, complex organ with amazing healing powers, but if more injuries are sustained before the brain is fully recovered the healing process gets interrupted.”

 

The content of this post is intended for general educational and informational purposes only; it does not constitute medical advice. Readers should always consult with a licensed healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment.

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