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Category: Sleep

What to Expect At Your Sleep Study

In a study from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 38 percent of adults living in New York reported getting less than the recommended seven hours of sleep per night. The CDC identifies daily sufficient sleep as one of the five key health behaviors for preventing chronic disease. 

“Poor sleep can lead to an increased risk for multiple medical issues, in addition to feeling poorly the next day. Depending on the cause, poor sleep can increase your risk for heart attack, stroke and other medical issues, just as much as untreated high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol and cigarette smoking,” said Director of the DENT Sleep Center, Dr. Marc Frost.

Insufficient sleep can be caused by a number of factors, many of which can be attributed to lifestyle habits such as late night electronic use or an inconsistent bedtime routine. However, in some instances poor sleep can be caused by a medical condition that must be diagnosed and treated by a medical professional. The first step in identifying if you have a sleep disorder is to consult with your primary care provider to decide if you should participate in a sleep study.

For many, a sleep study can seem overwhelming and intimidating. We asked Doug Lukaszewski, a sleep technician in the DENT Sleep Center, commonly asked questions about sleep studies, to clear up some of the common misconceptions surrounding the diagnostic test. 

1. Do I need a referral from my provider for a sleep study?

Yes, the DENT Sleep Center does require a referral from a physician. Once the DENT Sleep Center team has received the referral, they will seek authorization from the insurance company prior to scheduling.

2.  What Should I Bring to a Sleep Study? 

 All you need to bring to your sleep study are clothes to sleep in.

“Whether it is pajamas or shorts and a T-shirt, something you feel comfortable in will work best. Please do however, make sure whatever you bring to wear is appropriate,” said Lukaszewski.

Additionally, bring all medications that you usually take at night, none will be provided for you. Pillows and blankets are supplied, however you are welcome to bring one with you. 

It is important to remember to take everything you bring to the lab home with you. All the DENT Sleep Center rooms have a restroom that include a shower. If you intend to take a shower in the morning, towels, body wash, and shampoo are provided. Other toiletries are also provided (toothpaste, toothbrush, combs.) 

3. What time do sleep studies normally begin?

Patients are asked to arrive by 8:30 pm and upon arrival are escorted to their private rooms. After paperwork is completed, the sleep technician will apply all of the devices needed to monitor your bio information while sleeping, this process usually takes around 30 minutes. 

Patient should expect to be in bed anytime between 10:00-11:00 pm, and awakened at 5:30 am. 

4. Is there an alternative to having a sleep study done in the sleep lab or office?

The DENT Sleep Center does perform home sleep studies. At home sleep studies are very simple and utilize easy to use devices. Patients are taught how to use the device, to use for their sleep study that night. Information is stored on the device while you are sleeping and is downloaded by the technician. The information is then interpreted by a physician who specializes in sleep disorders. 

5. What are a few common conditions that would bring a person into the Sleep Center?

  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • insomnia
  • narcolepsy
  • periodic limb movements
  • somnambulism (sleep walking)
  • REM behavioral disorder

6. What happens if you can’t fall asleep?

Although the vast majority of patients do get a sufficient sleep in the office, a very small amount do not sleep. In this case, the physician can order another study or the patient can try an at home sleep study.

“Keep in mind the home sleep study devices are intended to almost exclusively diagnose sleep apnea, so there are limitations as to what it can do,” added Lukaszweski. 

The content of this post is intended for general educational and informational purposes only; it does not constitute medical advice.  Readers should always consult with a licensed healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment.

Ease Up On Electronics Before Bed – Your Brain Will Thank You

For many, scrolling through Facebook or Twitter in bed is just part of the nightly routine. However, studies show these activities, especially social media use, can be disruptful to the recovery processes that occur during sleep. 

We sat down with Director of the DENT Sleep Center, Dr. Marc Frost, who discussed the importance of turning off electronics before bed, and shared best practices for getting a good night’s sleep. 

Why is it important to “power down” before bed?

Sleep is an important way for the brain to recover from a day of critical thinking and decision making. Electronics use before bed stimulates the brain, making it difficult to fall asleep, therefore delaying and disrupting the recovery process. 

“Winding down before bed gives the brain a chance to start decompressing from all the activities of the day,” said Dr. Marc Frost. “Electronics that require active involvement like Facebook or Instagram, are too stimulating and require too much attention to allow you and your brain to properly wind down.”

In addition to over stimulation, electronics emit blue light that promotes wakefulness, counteracting the natural transition to sleep. 

“The light involved with the electronics can potentially lead to a decrease in natural melatonin levels. Melatonin is produced by the brain in the evening as it starts getting darker, working with your circadian rhythms to help induce sleep,” said Dr. Frost. “Bright lights prevent this.”

Dr. Frost added that while many electronics do have some type of night mode which attempt to change light frequencies, it is not an ideal or long-term solution.

Best Practices For Unplugging Before Bed

1. Limit significant physical activity (including exercise,) too close to bedtime. Exercise can have an energizing effect, making it difficult to fall asleep if done too close to bedtime. 

2. Avoid caffeine within several hours of bedtime. Some people are sensitive enough that consuming caffeine after dinner time or even after lunch can have negative effects on their ability to fall asleep. 

3. Limit alcohol consumption. Alcohol can be very disruptive to the sleep cycle. 

5. Limit the use of video games before bed. Video games are very stimulating because they rely on active involvement.

6. Get into routine! Make a habit of doing relaxing activities before bedtime so the brain will learn a relaxing pattern that signifies bedtime. These activities may include taking a warm bath or reading a book. 

The content of this post is intended for general educational and informational purposes only; it does not constitute medical advice.  Readers should always consult with a licensed healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment.

Back to School Sleep Tips

Summertime can take a toll on a child’s sleep routine. Sleepovers, vacations and fewer responsibilities make it easy for children to get out of a consistent sleep schedule, making the back to school transition that much more difficult.

We sat down with Attending Neurologist and Director of the DENT Sleep Center, Dr. Marc Frost, who explained how to ease your children back into a sleep routine, and why instilling healthy sleep habits in your children now will not only help them this school year, but can benefit them the rest of their lives. 

1.  What is the recommended amount of sleep for children and young adolescents?

“Depending on age, it could be as much as 8-9 or even 10 hours,” said Dr. Frost. “The best way to know that a child isn’t getting enough sleep is to note signs of tiredness throughout the day.”

Dr. Frost stated that signs of tiredness in children can manifest differently than in adults who will just feel tired and sleep.

“Children may sleep and nap, but may also just be inattentive. Children may even appear to be daydreaming, or show the opposite of what you might expect and be somewhat hyperactive.”

Dr. Frost added that mood and personality changes may also be observed.

 

2. What are some steps parents can take to get their children back on a regular sleep schedule?

“Taking steps to create a consistent routine should start the week prior to school,” said Dr. Frost. This routine can be created by putting children to bed and waking them up at the time you would normally for school. This will help ease children back into the school sleep routine.

“And as always, no electronics in the bed or bedroom and no caffeine in the evening,” added Dr. Frost.

 

3. Why is a consistent sleep schedule so important? Is it especially important for school-age children?

“We tend to be creatures of habit, so a regular schedule will promote regular sleep.” said Dr. Frost. “Instilling these habits in your children now will promote lifelong healthy sleep habits that will prevent sleep problems later in life.”

 

4. Is there evidence to suggest that children who have a consistent sleep schedule perform better in school?

“Tired children are inattentive and potentially hyperactive children,” said Dr. Frost. “This will clearly lead to poorer performance in school.”

Dr. Frost also added that poor sleep can lead to depression and anxiety, which will affect children both at school and at home. 

 

5. How can parents help their children practice healthy sleep habits?

Practicing the habits mentioned above can help children achieve a better quality of sleep, especially with school around the corner. 

“Parents also need to try and lead by example by maintaining good habits themselves,” said Dr. Frost. 

 

The content of this post is intended for general educational and informational purposes only; it does not constitute medical advice. Readers should always consult with a licensed healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment.

 

Tips for a Good Night’s Sleep

We sat down with Dr. Marc Frost, Attending Neurologist and Director of the DENT Sleep Center, who shared his tips for achieving and maintaining healthy sleep habits.

According to the Center for Disease Control, approximately 1 in 3 American adults aren’t getting enough sleep. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society recommend that adults 18–60 years of age, need at least 7 hours of sleep a night.

Why is sleep so important?

Getting a good night’s sleep is a vital part of staying physically and mentally healthy.

“Poor sleep can lead to an increased risk for multiple medical issues, in addition to feeling poorly the next day. Depending on the cause, poor sleep can increase your risk for heart attack, stroke and other medical issues, just as much as untreated high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol and cigarette smoking.” said Dr. Frost.

Poor sleep can also increase the risk for anxiety, depression and other mood related conditions.

Tips for Sleeping Well:

Regular Exercise

Exercising is an important part of sleeping well. Regular exercise is a great way to maintain a healthy sleep cycle and comes with a number of added benefits. However, try exercising earlier in the day, so that you aren’t working out too close to bedtime because it could leave you feeling too wired to fall asleep.

Consistent Sleep Schedule

Maintaining a consistent sleep schedule is imperative to achieving healthy sleep habits. Sleep hours should follow a routine from day to day, time to bed and time to wake should be consistent, even on weekends.

Be Careful of Over the Counter Sleep Aids

Over the counter sleeping pills, with the exception of melatonin, need to be used carefully. They are simply antihistamines, and should not be used for prolonged periods of time.

Myth vs. Fact:

MYTH: Drinking alcohol before bed will help you sleep better.

FACT: While it is true that alcohol may help you fall asleep faster, it is one of the most disruptive inhibitors to normal sleep. The sleep you get after drinking is very fragmented and unrefreshing. Alcohol use should be kept to at least several hours prior to bedtime.

Click here to learn more about our Sleep Center.

The content of this post is intended for general educational and informational purposes only; it does not constitute medical advice. Readers should always consult with a licensed healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment.